CALL TO SAIL

Special Call for nannofossil micropaleontologists and paleomagnetists to apply on IODP Expedition 387: Amazon Margin.

Expedition scheduled for 26 April to 26 June 2020

DEADLINE TO APPLY: 1 August 2019

ANZIC – IOPD is offering a unique opportunity to sail on Expedition 385 on-board the JOIDES Resolution.

Expedition 387 (based on IODP Proposals 859-Full2 & 859-PRL) will drill the upper portion of the Foz do Amazonas basin of the equatorial margin of Brazil to recover a complete, high-resolution sedimentary sequence spanning nearly the entire Cenozoic. This expedition is the marine complement to the Trans-Amazon Drilling Project transect of continental drill sites, and will address fundamental questions about the Cenozoic climatic evolution of the Amazon region, the origins and evolution of the neotropical rain forest and its incomparable biodiversity, the paleoceanographic history of the western equatorial Atlantic, and the origins of the transcontinental Amazon River. Core and log data from sites on the uppermost continental slope will be used to: (1) generate a continuous record of climate and biodiversity in Cenozoic South America at unprecedented resolution; (2) reconstruct the oceanographic conditions of the western tropical Atlantic; (3) provide critical marine biostratigraphic control for correlation with the Trans-Amazon Drilling Project; (4) determine the onset and history of trans-continental drainage of the proto-Amazon River into the Atlantic; and (5) test major hypotheses about the originations and extinctions of tropical South American biota.

For more information about the expedition science objectives and the JOIDES Resolution Expedition Schedule see  http://iodp.tamu.edu/scienceops/expeditions/amazon_margin.html

Or contact the ANZIC office iodp.administrator@anu.edu.au +61 2 6125 3420

WHO SHOULD APPLY: This special call is only addressed to nannofossil micropaleontologists  and paleomagnetists.

Click here to apply.

Drilling for DNA

Diatom paleontologist Dr. Linda Armbrecht wants to use the past to understand how modern climate change might affect marine life. But the microfossils she looks at every day through the microscope are only one piece of the puzzle. To answer questions about how ocean ecosystems have changed over the last 12,000 years and beyond, she’s looking for something else in the mud: ancient DNA.

Learn more about the science of Expedition 382 to Iceberg Alley aboard the JOIDES Resolution here: https://joidesresolution.org/expedition/382/

Video by: Lee Stevens

Music from https://filmmusic.io
“Industrious Ferret” by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)
License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/See Less

Drilling for DNA

Diatom paleontologist Dr. Linda Armbrecht wants to use the past to understand how modern climate change might affect marine life. But the microfossils she looks at every day through the microscope are only one piece of the puzzle. To answer questions about how ocean ecosystems have changed over the last 12,000 years and beyond, she’s looking for something else in the mud: ancient DNA.Learn more about the science of Expedition 382 to Iceberg Alley aboard the JOIDES Resolution here: https://joidesresolution.org/expedition/382/Video by: Lee StevensMusic from https://filmmusic.io"Industrious Ferret" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Posted by JOIDES Resolution on Friday, 17 May 2019

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