IODP OPPORTUNITIES

Apply to Sail in  2019

IODP Expedition 385 Guaymas Basin Tectonics and Biosphere Expedition

Applications Close 15th April 2018

 

September to November 2019

IODP Expedition 385 will core and log a series of sites in the Guaymas Basin to investigate the relationship of tectonics, magmatism, sedimentation, carbon cycling, and microbial activity. The Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California is a young, marginal rift basin characterized by active seafloor spreading and rapid deposition of organic-rich sediments from highly productive overlying waters. The active formation of oceanic crust combined with a thick sedimentary overburden has given rise to a dynamic environment, where strongly connected physical, chemical, and biological processes govern the cycling of sedimentary carbon. Its fate upon deposition depends on the relative efficiencies of interrelating microbial and chemical processes, leading either to sequestration or release of carbon.

Expedition 385 aims to illuminate the interaction between these processes and its ultimate consequences for carbon cycling, which will help understand similar settings in marginal seas throughout the world.

Drilling toward and through seismically imaged sills of varying age and temperature into the intercalated sill-sediment package will provide core and log data to constrain the links between sediment accumulation, sill emplacement, sediment alteration, fluid expulsion, as well as microbial utilization and sequestration of carbon along subseafloor fluid pathways. The primary objectives are to (1) Explore the physical and chemical gradients along active and extinct fluid pathways associated with sill emplacement; (2) Investigate subsurface microbial communities that are sustained by alteration products, in order to determine how efficiently they capture carbon-bearing alteration products; and (3) Advance our understanding of the conditions that limit life in the deep biosphere.

Coring sill-sediment successions will provide an integrated record of igneous accretion as well as baseline data of carbon flux, including unaltered subsurface sediments and those that have experienced multiple generations of sill intrusion at depth. Petrophysical data (e.g., porosity/permeability) will also constrain crustal fluid flow and heat exchange that exert fundamental controls on this system. All findings will deepen our understanding of mechanisms of carbon remobilization implicated in global-scale rapid climate change.

For more information about the expedition science objectives and the JOIDES Resolution Expedition Schedule see http://iodp.tamu.edu/scienceops/ – this includes links to the individual expedition web pages with the original IODP proposal and expedition planning information.

ANZIC applications

Australians should visit www.iodp.org.au for a link to the application form, a completed version of which should be sent to Neville Exon (Neville.Exon@anu.edu.au) and Rob McKay (robert.mckay@vuw.ac.nz), with all parts in one document. New Zealanders should contact Chris Hollis (NZODP@gns.cri.nz) on how to proceed.

Applicants should bear in mind that their applications will be firstly reviewed and ranked by the ANZIC Science Committee and, if they pass that hurdle, by the expedition co-chief scientists.  Clearly, they need to convince both groups that they would be excellent in the role.

The ANZIC Science Committee makes allowance for the relative opportunities of the applicants, so that early career researchers, including graduate students, have a good chance of selection. Note that non-tenured applicants must have a position at an Australian or New Zealand member institution for at least one year after the sampling party in Bremen in early 2019, and ideally more, to enable them to carry out the necessary post cruise research.

As well as the form, applicants should provide:

1. Participation Plan and Budget (maximum of four pages): This should set out why they are interested in the expedition, how their skills suit the position applied for, what they would bring to the expedition, and the nature of their initial post-cruise research plans (including publication plans), and a brief outline of what budget they might need beyond that covered by their institution.

To maximise the return to ANZIC from the involvement of our scientists on expeditions, we ask that applicants endeavour to assemble a team, including ANZIC scientists, of potential land-based science party members in various fields, set out who has agreed to join that team if you are successful, and what they would aim to do post-cruise. The potential existence of such a team, which would provide additional analytical and scientific skills, would strengthen the applications. If all went to plan, the team members could be attached to the land-based science party, and thus get early access to material from the vessel. Of course, final research plans will depend on the material actually recovered by the vessel, and negotiations in Bremen as to who does what.

2. Curriculum Vitae including selected publications (maximum of two pages)

3. Letter of support for non-tenured applicants by their supervisor: This should cover general support from the institution for the application, include an outline of the proffered post-cruise support, and indicate when the present position, or a new position, will end (at least one year post-cruise is required).

4. Financial support: For ANZIC scientists all travel costs, including those to some post-cruise meetings, would be covered by ANZIC. In addition the ANZIC IODP Office may provide up to $A40,000 for post-cruise activities (mainly analytical costs) for Australian and New Zealand university and research institution scientists and post-graduate students, if funding cannot be obtained in any other way. Applications for such funding can only be made after expeditions are completed and samples are in hand.

5. Application deadline: The deadline for scientists to submit applications to ANZIC is 15th April, 2018. Candidates shortlisted by us will be considered by ESO in European Summer/Fall 2017.This is an excellent opportunity for scientists, doctoral students or post docs to collaborate with an international team of scientists. Neville Exon and Rob McKay will be happy to provide advice for the applications, and help where possible with timing problems for non-tenured scientists or post-graduate students.

 

IODP Expedition 383 Dynamics of Pacific Antarctic Circumpolar Current (DYNAPACC)

Applications close 1 March, 2018

IODP Expedition 383 will investigate the Pliocene-Pleistocene atmosphere-ocean-cryosphere dynamics of the Pacific Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), and their role in regional and global climate and atmospheric CO2based on sediment records with the highest possible stratigraphic resolution.

The expedition will test two major scientific hypotheses: (1) ACC dynamics and Drake Passage throughflow conditioned the global Meridional Overturning Circulation and high-low climate linkages on orbital and submillennial time-scales since the Pliocene. (2) Variations in the Pacific ACC determine the physical and biological characteristics of the oceanic carbon pump and atmospheric CO2.

The ACC is the world’s largest current system connecting all three major basins of the global ocean (the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans) integrating and responding to climate signals throughout the globe. By inducing strong upwelling and formation of new water masses, the ACC also fundamentally affects the global meridional overturning circulation (MOC) and the stability of Antarctica’s ice sheets, and has been recognized as a key mechanism in regulating variations in atmospheric CO2 and global climate.

IODP Expedition 383 is based on IODP Proposals 912-Full & 912-Add and will target six primary sites on a transect in the central South Pacific between the modern Polar Front and the Subantarctic Zone, and at the Chilean Margin close to the Drake Passage. Central Pacific sites will document the Plio-Quaternary ACC paleoenvironmental history at water depths ranging from 5100 to 3600 m. At the Chilean Margin the sites provide a depth transect (~1000–3900 m) across the major Southern Ocean water masses that will document Plio-Pleistocene changes in the vertical structure of the ACC—a key issue for understanding the role of the Southern Ocean in the global carbon cycle.

The planned drilling strategy is designed for recovering sediment sequences suitable for ultra-high-resolution studies. The proposed sites are located at latitudes and water depths where sediments will allow the application of a wide range of siliciclastic, carbonate, and opal-based proxies for reconstructing surface to deep ocean variations and their relation to atmosphere and cryosphere changes with unprecedented stratigraphic detail.

Full details of Expedition 383

 

Who should apply

Opportunities exist for researchers (including graduate students) in all shipboard specialties—including but not limited to sedimentologists, micropaleontologists, paleomagnetists, inorganic/organic geochemists, petrologists, petrophysicists, microbiologists, and borehole geophysicists.

ANZIC applications

Australians should visit www.iodp.org.au for a link to the application form, a completed version of which should be sent to Neville Exon (Neville.Exon@anu.edu.au) and Rob McKay (robert.mckay@vuw.ac.nz), with all parts in one document. New Zealanders should contact Chris Hollis (NZODP@gns.cri.nz) on how to proceed.

Applicants should bear in mind that their applications will be firstly reviewed and ranked by the ANZIC Science Committee and, if they pass that hurdle, by the expedition co-chief scientists.  Clearly, they need to convince both groups that they would be excellent in the role.

The ANZIC Science Committee makes allowance for the relative opportunities of the applicants, so that early career researchers, including graduate students, have a good chance of selection. Note that non-tenured applicants must have a position at an Australian or New Zealand member institution for at least one year after the sampling party in Bremen in early 2019, and ideally more, to enable them to carry out the necessary post cruise research.

As well as the form, applicants should provide:

1. Participation Plan and Budget (maximum of four pages): This should set out why they are interested in the expedition, how their skills suit the position applied for, what they would bring to the expedition, and the nature of their initial post-cruise research plans (including publication plans), and a brief outline of what budget they might need beyond that covered by their institution.

To maximise the return to ANZIC from the involvement of our scientists on expeditions, we ask that applicants endeavour to assemble a team, including ANZIC scientists, of potential land-based science party members in various fields, set out who has agreed to join that team if you are successful, and what they would aim to do post-cruise. The potential existence of such a team, which would provide additional analytical and scientific skills, would strengthen the applications. If all went to plan, the team members could be attached to the land-based science party, and thus get early access to material from the vessel. Of course, final research plans will depend on the material actually recovered by the vessel, and negotiations in Bremen as to who does what.

2. Curriculum Vitae including selected publications (maximum of two pages)

3. Letter of support for non-tenured applicants by their supervisor: This should cover general support from the institution for the application, include an outline of the proffered post-cruise support, and indicate when the present position, or a new position, will end (at least one year post-cruise is required).

4. Financial support: For ANZIC scientists all travel costs, including those to some post-cruise meetings, would be covered by ANZIC. In addition the ANZIC IODP Office may provide up to $A40,000 for post-cruise activities (mainly analytical costs) for Australian and New Zealand university and research institution scientists and post-graduate students, if funding cannot be obtained in any other way. Applications for such funding can only be made after expeditions are completed and samples are in hand.

5. Application deadline: The deadline for scientists to submit applications to ANZIC is 1st of March, 2018. Candidates shortlisted by us will be considered by ESO in European Summer/Fall 2017.This is an excellent opportunity for scientists, doctoral students or post docs to collaborate with an international team of scientists. Neville Exon and Rob McKay will be happy to provide advice for the applications, and help where possible with timing problems for non-tenured scientists or post-graduate students.