CALL – IODP Environmental Protection and Safety Panel (EPSP)

Role background and work of the IODP EPSP

The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Environmental Protection and Safety Panel (EPSP) is an advisory body of the JOIDES Resolution Facility Board (JRFB) which is composed of volunteer domain experts from IODP member countries. The EPSP primarily carries out a site-by-site review of proposed or scheduled IODP expeditions from the point of view of safety and environmental protection. The ECORD Facility Board and Chikyu IODP Board (non-riser projects only) also use EPSP as an advisory body.

The EPSP’s work is organized by its panel Chair, working closely with the platform Science Operators and the Facility Board Chairs. The date of the EPSP’s annual meeting is determined by the scheduling needs of the platforms.

Expedition proposal proponents are notified in advance by the IODP Science Support Office if their proposal is scheduled for EPSP review. Proponents are required to prepare and submit a Safety Review Report two months before the meeting. EPSP protocol requests that one proponent representative (usually the data lead) attend the meeting to give a presentation based on their report and interact with the panel. EPSP review often requires modification to the drilling plan (for example, relocation of sites) and submission of new Site Forms via a proposal Addendum.

Responsibilities of the ANZIC EPSP representative

The ANZIC representative’s role on the EPSP panel is of high importance within the IODP and is expected to deliver benefits to the ANZIC community not only through actively representing ANZIC, but also by providing advice to the ANZIC community who intend to or are developing proposal submissions to IODP.

The ANZIC Governing Council and ANZIC Office require a brief post-meeting report of your activities, highlighting issues of relevance to ANZIC or that may be of general advice to the ANZIC community.

Desired ANZIC representative expertise and contributions to EPSP

The ANZIC representative must have expertise relevant to the work of the EPSP and be willing to openly express their views to the EPSP. Preference may be given to individuals who have expertise in shallow hazards, hydrates, and geophysical interpretation.  

ANZIC support provided for the EPSP representative

The ANZIC Office will support your success in the role by providing appropriate resources and insights to the work of ANZIC and more broadly the IODP, including connecting you with relevant experts in the international scientific ocean drilling network should you require help with a task. ANZIC also covers the cost of economy airfares (organised through ANZIC’s ANU travel consultant), accommodation at the EPSP nominated lodging (includes meals/wi-fi), local transfers between the airport and your residence, and meals during transit. Any additional costs are at your institution’s or your own expense.

Submission of Expressions of Interest

ANZIC community members interested in serving on EPSP should submit an expression of interest to the ANZIC Office by COB (AEDT) November 15, 2021.

Your EOI should comprise a letter that states (1) your reasons for interest in serving ANZIC on the EPSP and (2) the expertise and experience you would bring to the position, and be accompanied by a brief (2-3 page) supporting CV that summarizes and documents key achievements, attributes and relevant expertise to the role of ANZIC representative on EPSP.

In memory of Professor Leanne Armand

We regret to announce to the ANZIC and IODP communities that Leanne Armand, ANZIC Director and remarkable scientific leader, passed away on January 4, 2021.

Those of us lucky enough to have worked closely with Leanne, and to know her well, have lost a truly special colleague and friend. We are heartbroken by this loss but are blessed with countless fond memories.

Leanne will be remembered as an exceptional mentor and scientific leader, who was completely and selflessly dedicated to the success of ANZIC and the IODP, and to supporting the careers of our new and emerging researchers. Leanne was tireless in her efforts to make the world a better place.

Leanne invigorated ANZIC and transformed its standing and influence in the international scientific drilling program. This will have enduring impact for generations to come, as will her contributions to the science of the Southern Ocean and diatom distributions and ecology, which will continue to guide and inspire future research.

Leanne, somehow, always managed to bring her unique good humour and indomitable spirit to the fore despite the challenges of her illness and the added difficulties imposed by the pandemic.  We were pleased to learn Leanne was able to experience Christmas and New Year surrounded by her close family. We offer our sincere condolences to all of them, especially Stephane, Leanne’s husband, and to Gaston and Maxime her two boys.

The Funeral Service for Professor Leanne Armand will be on Thursday, January 13 2022 @ 4:30pm (AEST). A virtual link is available from the IODP administrator, please contact Kelly Kenney at iodp.administrator@anu.edu.au for further details.

Professor Leanne Armand’s obituary can be found HERE.

post

2020 AGU Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize

Congratulations Rob McKay, awarded the 2020 Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize for outstanding contributions to Antarctic glacial history, especially through leadership of research through scientific ocean drilling, is an extraordinary achievement. Given in partnership between the American Geophysical Union and the Japan Geoscience Union, the Prize recognizes outstanding, transdisciplinary research accomplishment in ocean drilling. Rob joins an illustrious cohort of previous honorees who represent the vanguard of scientific ocean drilling research.

Rob is the first ANZIC recipient of this prize and we hope others will be honoured.

Kudos to Rob – well-done and well-deserved!
https://bit.ly/38xfBlt

CALL – IODP EXPEDITION 399

Opportunity for ANZIC Members to apply to participate in JOIDES Resolution Expedition 399:  

Building Blocks of Life, Atlantis Massif

7 April to 7 June 2023

The Atlantis Massif (AM) Oceanic Core Complex (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is one of the earliest sites recognized for the extensive exposure of ultramafic and mafic rocks at the seafloor caused by an oceanic detachment fault, and has been the focus of four IODP Expeditions (304, 305, 340T, and 357). The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is hosted in peridotite on its southern wall and vents alkaline fluids rich in H2 as a by-product of serpentinization. The AM is therefore an ideal natural laboratory for studying tectonics, magmatism, and the interaction between the ocean and lithosphere, as well as their combined influence on ocean chemistry and the subseafloor biosphere.

Expedition 399 has three main scientific objectives:

1. Characterizing the life-cycle of an oceanic core complex including links among igneous, metamorphic, structural, and fluid flow processes.

2. Accessing the chemical kitchen preceding the appearance of life on Earth, including the formation of organic molecules of prebiotic interest at high and low temperatures.

3. Identifying the extent of the deep biosphere and limits for life, including how they are influenced by lithological substrate, porosity and permeability, temperature, fluid chemistry, and reactive gradients

A principle aim of the expedition is to sample fluids and rocks in a stable regime where active serpentinization may be occurring, creating the conditions where the building blocks for life (H2, CH4, and more complex organic compounds form abiotically. IODP Hole U1309D, located 5 km north of the LCHF, is the deepest (1415 m) hole drilled so far in young (<2 Ma) ocean crust, and recovered a primitive series of gabbroic rocks interpreted in part to be metasomatised peridotite. Expedition 399 will sample fluids in the existing Hole U1309D using newly developed temperature-sensitive sampling tools. It will also deepen Hole U1309D to ~2060 mbsf, where temperatures up to 220°C are predicted, and leave it available for future logging and fluid sampling once thermal equilibrium has returned. The proportion of ultramafic rocks is expected to increase with depth, and at these temperatures serpentinization and hydrogen generation by redox reactions should be actively occurring. Volatiles and organic molecules will be sampled in fluid inclusions to identify the physicochemical conditions that lead to their formation.

A second shallow (~200 mbsf) hole will be cored close to the LCHF to obtain a complete section through a detachment fault zone in serpentinized peridotite, extending the findings of Expedition 357. It targets zones of higher porosity that may facilitate geochemical and microbial processes. A re-entry system will be installed to allow for future deeper drilling, logging, fluid sampling, and a borehole observatory. The thermal structure of this Hole will place important constraints on the Lost City circulation system, and there is a possibility of intersecting Lost City fluids pathways

For more information on the expedition science objectives and the JOIDES Resolution expedition schedule, see http://iodp.tamu.edu/scienceops/. This site includes links to individual expedition web pages with the original IODP proposals and expedition planning information.

Application deadline: 1 February 2022


WHO SHOULD APPLY: We encourage applications from all qualified scientists. The JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) is committed to a policy of broad participation and inclusion, and to providing a safe, productive, and welcoming environment for all program participants. Opportunities exist for researchers (including graduate students) in all shipboard specialties, including petrologists, structural geologists, geochemists interested in igneous processes, fluid-rock interaction, gases and organic geochemistry, microbiologists, physical properties specialists, paleomagnetists, and borehole geophysicists. Good working knowledge of the English language is required.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION BEFORE YOU APPLY

Australian ANZIC member applicants :

  1.  All applicants must have their sign off by their institution DVC-Research or other appropriate institutional level, that their institution approves their travel and will insure them for that travel to and from the port of departure and arrival.
  2. It is agreed that Institutions will cover any additional cost related to delays to a return or additional quarantine costs.
  3. ANZIC will cover:
  • flights and ground transport/incidentals to/from the ship, any pre-departure mandatory quarantine period (up to ~A$3000 for Australian members (accommodation and hotel meals); the cost of a pre-flight COVID test (if required, and as outlined in the IODP COVID policy)
  • will continue to support the selected expeditioner with coverage of required pre-cruise medicals (Aust only; NZ to detail)
  •  up to $40K (over 2 years, Australian members) is available to conduct the expected research related to the international expedition.
  • Visa expenses will be covered by ANZIC  but organised by the expeditioner in consultation with the JRSO if an ANZIC candidate is selected to sail.

Without this sign off an applicant will not be assessed by ANZIC for the expeditioner role advertised and, therefore, will not be forwarded to the JRSO for consideration as an expeditioner

New Zealand ANZIC Member Applicants: Please contact Stuart Henrys (nzodp@gns.cri.nz) prior to submitting your application to inquire about the prerequisites that will apply.


SPECIAL CALL – JOIDES Resolution EXPEDITIONS 390 & 393

Call for application for JOIDES Resolution Expeditions 390 and 393

Deadline for scientists to apply: ~15 October 2021🚢

Expedition 390: South Atlantic Transect 1 (7 April to 7 June 2022)

Expedition 393: South Atlantic Transect 2 (7 June to 7 August 2022)

South Atlantic Transect Expeditions 390 and 393 (IODP Proposals 853-Full2 and 853-Add) are a multidisciplinary and joint scientific drilling project that aims to recover complete sedimentary sections and ~200 m of oceanic crust at sites along a crustal age transect at ~31°S across the South Atlantic to (1) investigate the history of the low-temperature hydrothermal interactions between the aging ocean crust and the evolving South Atlantic Ocean; (2) quantify past hydrothermal contributions to global geochemical cycles; (3) investigate the sediment and basement-hosted microbial community in the low energy South Atlantic Gyre subseafloor biosphere; and (4) investigate the response of subtropical biota and ocean circulation in the core of the global conveyor belt and the subtropical gyre in the South Atlantic Ocean as a result of the opening of the Drake Passage.

The South Atlantic Transect expeditions will target six primary sites on 7, 15, 31, 49, and 61 Ma ocean crust. The proposed transect, which follows a Mid-Atlantic Ridge crustal flow-line, will fill critical gaps in our sampling of intact in-situ ocean crust with regards to crustal age, spreading rate, and sediment thickness. The transect traverses the previously unexplored sediment- and basalt-hosted deep biosphere beneath the South Atlantic gyre, samples of which are essential to refine global biomass estimates and investigate microbial ecosystems’ responses to variable conditions in a low energy gyre and aging ocean crust. The transect is located near World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) line A10, providing present-day carbonate chemistry and deep-water mass properties across the western South Atlantic for comparison to records of key Cenozoic intervals of elevated atmospheric CO2 and rapid climate change. Reconstruction of the history of the deep western boundary current and deep-water formation in the Atlantic basins will yield crucial data to test hypotheses regarding the role of evolving thermohaline circulation patterns in climate change, and the effects of tectonic gateways and climate on ocean acidification.

General expedition information:http://iodp.tamu.edu/…/exp…/south_atlantic_transect.htmlScientific Prospectus link: http://publications.iodp.org/scientific_prospectus/390_393/

Who Should Apply: We encourage applications from all qualified scientists (including graduate students) in (1) microbiology and sedimentology for Expedition 390, and (2) microbiology for Expedition 393.Microbiology candidates with experience using sediment oxygen sensors or handling hard rock microbiology samples are encouraged. The JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) is committed to a policy of broad participation and inclusion, and to providing a safe and welcoming environment for all participants. Good working knowledge of the English language is required.COVID-19 Protocol: The JRSO has created a protocol to safely operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. If pandemic conditions have not improved by early-mid 2022, one or both expeditions may need to sail with a reduced shipboard contingent. However, all participants will maintain their designation as science party members regardless of whether they sail or not, and will have equal access to all expedition data and core materials. The protocol is available here: http://iodp.tamu.edu/…/JR_COVID-Mitigation-Protocols.pdf.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION BEFORE YOU APPLY Australian applicants :

  1.  All applicants must have their sign off by their institution DVC-Research or other appropriate institutional level, that their institution approves their travel and will insure them for that travel to and from the port of departure and arrival.
  2. It is agreed that Institutions will cover any additional cost related to delays to a return or additional quarantine costs.
  3. ANZIC will cover:
  • flights and ground transport/incidentals to/from the ship, any pre-departure mandatory quarantine period (up to ~A$3000 for Australian members (accommodation and hotel meals); the cost of a pre-flight COVID test (if required, and as outlined in the IODP COVID policy)
  • will continue to support the selected expeditioner with coverage of required pre-cruise medicals (Aust only; NZ to detail)
  •  up to $40K (over 2 years, Australian members) is available to conduct the expected research related to the international expedition.
  • Visa expenses will be covered by ANZIC  but organised by the expeditioner in consultation with the JRSO if an ANZIC candidate is selected to sail.

Without this sign off an applicant will not be assessed by ANZIC for the expeditioner role advertised and, therefore, will not be forwarded to the JRSO for consideration as an expeditioner

New Zealand Applicants: Please contact Stuart Henrys (nzodp@gns.cri.nz) prior to submitting your application to inquire about the prerequisites that will apply.  

New ANZIC Program Manager joins our team!

Please welcome Dr Sarah Kachovich who will be joining us October, 15 2021 as the ANZIC Program Manager. Dr Sarah Kachovich will oversee ANZIC operations and will report directly to Professor Leanne Armand, ANZIC Program Director.

Dr Kachovich holds a first-class Bachelor of Science (Honours) degree in Geology from The University of Wollongong and a PhD in micropaleontology, specialising in Radiolaria taxonomy from The University of Queensland. Dr Kachovich’s major research focus has been on recognizing the latent biostratigraphical potential of Paleozoic Radiolaria, through investigating 3-D X-ray models. Her applied biostratigraphical research focuses on linking microfossils to tectonic problems, such as the Himalayan collision and the tectonic evolution of the New England orogen in eastern Australia.

Through ANZIC, Dr Kachovich had the opportunity to sail as a radiolarist on the IODP’s Expedition 362: Sumatra Subduction Zone. As for many, sailing on the JOIDES Resolution was a life-changing experience that jumpstarted and broadened her career, especially internationally. Since graduating from her PhD, Dr Kachovich moved to the heart of the IODP, to work for the JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) at Texas A&M University. At the JRSO, she has been deeply involved with the technical and operational aspect of the program, where she has sailed on a further five IODP expeditions as the Imaging Specialist.

When the modern world came to a standstill in 2020-21, with the global COVID-19 pandemic, the program had to adapt and keep drilling without its science party. While working closely with the U.S. Science Support Program (USSSP), Dr Kachovich took the lead on the public relations movement via the program’s social platforms. Here she has been addressing the JRSO’s online social responsibility and moreover, been strengthening societal connections to the program by effectively communicating a relatable understanding of scientific exploration.

Dr Kachovich has worked extensively for gender equity within the Earth and environmental sciences in Australia, where she is a co-founder of the Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences Australasia Network (WOMEESA) and the Dorothy Hill Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences Symposium.

Dr Kachovich supports our values and mission, and is full of energy and ideas to support ANZIC, and deepen and extend our network.


We are excited for you to join the ANZIC Team!

IODP Site Survey Data Bank (SSDB) Information Sessions

The IODP Science Support Office will hold two information sessions on the Site Survey Data Bank (SSDB), the data submission system for IODP proposals. The sessions will cover best practices for organizing and submitting your data, how to use the SSDB, recent changes to the system, and common data problems. They will each end with an open question and answer period. The sessions are designed for anyone submitting data to the November 1st data deadline. The two sessions will cover the same material.



The first session will be held at 19:00PDT on October 5th (02:00UTC on October 6th). To register: https://ucsd.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUldOipqDMrEtH65lAK35fpiVkKBlx2vnXe
The second session will be held at 08:00PDT on October 6th (15:00UTC on October 6th). To register: https://ucsd.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0rc-mtqTssH9c49WDec1Z-VgrDQF-B_ddA

IODP EXPEDITION CALL 397 & 398

Apply to participate in JOIDES Resolution Expeditions 397 and 398
 
 Expedition 397: Iberian Margin Paleoclimate
6 October to 6 December 2022
 
The Iberian Margin has rapidly accumulating sediment that contains a high-fidelity late Pleistocene record of millennial climate variability (MCV). Sir Nickolas Shackleton demonstrated that piston cores from this region can be correlated precisely to polar ice cores from both hemispheres. Moreover, the narrow continental shelf off Portugal results in the rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment, thereby allowing correlation of marine and ice core records to European terrestrial sequences. Few places exist in the world where such detailed marine-ice-terrestrial linkages are possible. The continuity, high sedimentation rates, and fidelity of climate signals preserved in sediments make this region a prime target for ocean drilling. During IODP Expedition 339, Site U1385 was drilled and recovered a complete record of hemipelagic sedimentation for the last 1.43 Ma with a mean sedimentation rate of 11 cm/kyr. IODP Expedition 397 will extend this remarkable sediment archive through the Pliocene and recover a complete depth transect of five sites that will provide a complete suite of downhole records with which to study past variability in the major subsurface water masses of the North Atlantic.

 
Expedition 398: Hellenic Arc Volcanic Field
6 December 2022 to 5 February 2023
 
The Hellenic Arc Christiana-Santorini-Kolumbo (CSK) volcanic field, which includes Santorini caldera and its Late Bronze Age eruption, provides a unique opportunity to address how subduction-related volcanism impacts life. Better understanding of island-arc volcanism requires study of the processes that drive such volcanism, and how the volcanoes interact with the marine environment. What are the links between crustal tectonics, volcanic activity, and magma genesis? What are the dynamics and impacts of submarine explosive volcanism and caldera-forming eruptions? What are the reactions of marine ecosystems to volcanic eruptions? The rift basins around the CSK field, as well as Santorini caldera, contain volcano-sedimentary fills up to several hundreds of meters thick. We propose to drill six sites, four in the rifts basins and two in Santorini caldera. Deep drilling is essential to characterize and interpret the depositional packages visible on seismic images, to chemically correlate primary volcaniclastic layers in the rift fills with their source volcanoes, to fill in gaps in onland volcanic records, to provide a precise chronostratigraphic framework for rift tectonic and sedimentary histories, and to characterize the subsurface microbial life.
For more information on the expedition science objectives and the JOIDES Resolution expedition schedule, see http://iodp.tamu.edu/scienceops/. This site includes links to individual expedition web pages with the original IODP proposals and expedition planning information.
 
Application deadline: 1 November 2021
 
WHO SHOULD APPLY: We encourage applications from all qualified scientists. The JOIDES Resolution Science Operator (JRSO) is committed to a policy of broad participation and inclusion, and to providing a safe, productive, and welcoming environment for all program participants. Opportunities exist for researchers (including graduate students) in all shipboard specialties, including micropaleontologists, sedimentologists, volcanologists, petrologists, igneous geochemists, inorganic and organic geochemists, paleomagnetists, microbiologists, physical properties specialists, and borehole geophysicists. Good working knowledge of the English language is required.
 
IMPORTANT INFORMATION BEFORE YOU APPLY

Australian applicants :  All applicants must have their sign off by their institution DVC-Research or other appropriate institutional level, that their institution approves their travel and will insure them for that travel to and from the port of departure and arrival.It is agreed that Institutions will cover any additional cost related to delays to a return or additional quarantine costs.ANZIC will cover: flights and ground transport/incidentals to/from the ship, any pre-departure mandatory quarantine period (up to ~A$3000 for Australian members (accommodation and hotel meals); the cost of a pre-flight COVID test (if required, and as outlined in the IODP COVID policy) will continue to support the selected expeditioner with coverage of required pre-cruise medicals (Aust only; NZ to detail)  up to $40K (over 2 years, Australian members) is available to conduct the expected research related to the international expedition. Visa expenses will be covered by ANZIC  but organised by the expeditioner in consultation with the JRSO if an ANZIC candidate is selected to sail. Without this sign off an applicant will not be assessed by ANZIC for the expeditioner role advertised and, therefore, will not be forwarded to the JRSO for consideration as an expeditioner.

New Zealand Applicants: Please contact Stuart Henrys (nzodp@gns.cri.nz) prior to submitting your application to inquire about the prerequisites that will apply.  
Application to Sail & Information

Welcome to our New Chair, Dr Chris Pigram AM FTSE

Dr Pigram trained as a geologist (UNSW and ANU) and has been a senior research manager since 1993. He was the Chief Executive Officer of Geoscience Australia, the national geoscience agency, from 2010-2017.  As CEO he was the architect of several major programmes and successful funding bids. Dr Pigram has served on the Executive Management Boards of several Government Departments (Department Resources, Energy and Tourism and Department of Innovation, Industry and Science).  Dr Pigram was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2019.

Dr Pigram is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. In 2016 he was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE).  From May-December 2017 he was the interim Director of the National Computation Infrastructure, Australia’s research supercomputing facility. Dr Pigram was a member of the 2018 Australian Government Resources Taskforce that delivered a report containing 29 recommendations designed to ensure the future of the resources sector in Australia.

Dr Pigram is Chair of the Independent Expert Scientific Committee that advises government on water issues related to large coal mines and coal seam gas developments.

He is Chair of the MinEX CRC which will deliver the next generation of fast, safe drilling technology to make Australia internationally competitive by enabling deep mineral exploration in Australia.

He is Chair of AuScope Limited a company that manages research infrastructure funds for the geoscience research community on behalf the Australian Government.

He is Chair of the GNS (NZ) Strategic Science and Users Advisory Panel and a member of the Advisory Panel for CSIRO’s Deep Earth Imaging Future Science Platform. Dr Pigram is also Chair of CSIRO Minerals Resources Advisory Committee and was recently appointed to the Australian Space Agency Advisory Group.